Social Distance App 2020-10-20T17:33:25+00:00

SOCIAL DISTANCE

walking crowd of people

I.
Case Study Contents

  1. Case Study Contents
  2. The Social Distance Interactive App
  3. Team Design Tasks
  4. The Social Distance App Story
  5. Who Why When Where What How
  6. First Thoughts Affinity Diagram
  7. User Interview Questions
  8. User Research Questions
  9. Competitive Analysis:
  10. mContain App
  11. Crowdless App
  12. Second Apple and Google
  13. Virus Detection App
  14. Bubble App
  15. Style sheet with Mood Board
  16. Two Personas
  17. Two User Scenarios
  18. User Tasks & Flow Chart
  19. Lo-fi Wireframe (earliest)
  20. High Fi InVision Prototype
  21. Prototype with Interactivity
  22. Conclusion
  23. Next Steps

II.
The Final
SOCIAL DISTANCE App
(Tap to engage)

III.
Team UXUI Tasks

Devin Thane

Prototype Concept
Two Personas
The Story
User Research Questions
User Tasks & Flow Chart
Revised 1st Version Lo-fi Wireframe
1st Invision Hi-fidelity Prototype
1st Version Interactive Prototype

Pat Mills-Sullivan

Insights & Preliminary Research
Scenarios 
Prototype Development
Style Sheet
Mood Board
Affinity Mapping
Prototype Edits & Feedback
What Why How When Where Who
Competitive Analysis
Design Process
2nd version Lo-fi Wireframe
2nd Invision Hi-fidelity Prototype
2nd version Prototype Interactivity
Conclusion
Next Steps

IV.
The Social Distance App Story

        Jeremy is running low on groceries. He goes to the store to pick a few things. Using the Social Distance app, he can track all nearby customers, alerting him whenever someone with a high fever comes within 10 feet. Secondly, the app operates with new technology that alerts him when someone with a registered history of Covid within a 3 month window is tracked. The app will vibrate or give a distinctive alert tone to indicate such a person and will indicate front, back, left or right proximity to the User.

The app is also able to keep a history of his locations, the day of the week and the number of potentially infected persons detected. This gives the User a better since when Covid infection exposure is highest and lowest for any given address or site. This feature works in conjunction with Mapquest and GPS apps.

V.
Who Why When Where What How


Individuals and business owners can know when the presence of high fever sufferers are within a 20 feet radius. The app alerts by tone or vibration. The app also records time, date, and place data with readings.


Mask wearing and social distancing is a disregarded practice among many Americans. This app helps to increases the safety of the app user


The app technology is similar to existing sensors used for the purpose of detecting high body heat and human movement. This app can also identify a positive Covid19 sufferer by cell phone number.


The app technology is similar to existing sensors used for the purpose of detecting high body heat and human movement. This app can also identify a positive Covid19 sufferer by cell phone number. No name


The app is ideal for public places and spaces, indoors and outside. It helps business to plan for more strategic safety planning for times, days and particular seasons of the year.


The maker of this free app is the medical technology firm, Virusosity Inc. As a non-profit initiative, Virousity wants to help keep its thousands of employees and any app user safer.

VI.
First Thoughts Affinity Diagram

VII.
Research Questions and
Users Consensus Response

Pat: Based on the wireframe (or prototype before you), please describe how you would turn on the app. How would you turn it off?
User responses:

Pat: Is it important to have a subtle or strong vibration warning?
User responses:

Pat: How do you turn the vibration warning up, down, and off?
User responses:

Pat: Does the screen diagram clearly represent to you the presence and severity of high fever?
User responses:

Pat: Would you like control that automatically lowers the sound alarm whenever you are having a phone conversation?
User responses:

Pat: Is it more important to control fever detection only within approx 6 ft or less. Does that app setting make more sense for you?
User responses:

Pat: Do you recognize the meaning and purpose of all the icons?
User responses:

Pat: Storing crowd and monitoring results are available. Please show me your steps taken to store such information?
User responses:

Pat: How do you feel about being warned with words: Front, Behind, Left, or Right position of the feverish person(s), red flashing alert appears when you are either on or off a call?
User responses:

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VIII.
User Interview Questions And Answers

Pat/Devin: How have you been maintaining an acceptable distance between people when you have to go out to get groceries, for example?
Jeremy: I have done my best by eyeballing it, but in grocery stores, you can’t always predict where people are going to pop up as you come around an aisle.

INTERVIEWER: That is a reasonable issue, but how do you react when this happens?
Jeremy: It varies. One time I was actually stopped and asked a question by someone. I feel like it would be rude to see someone and then back away immediately, you know?

Pat/Devin: Yes, that would be rude, but what would help prevent this?
JEREMY: If I saw them coming, it would be fine, but unfortunately, as I said, the aisles can block my view.

Pat/Devin: What if you had something on your phone that would show you nearby feverish people who may or may not be suffering from a virus, so you wouldn’t have to worry about a person right around the corner?
JEREMY: That would be fantastic, but I use my phone for lots of purposes, so it would be difficult to use both at the same time and also pay attention to my actual surroundings. It must be unintrusive as possible.

Pat/Devin: Ok, that is a good point.

IX.
The MContain App:
The Competitor Analysis 

Here’s an app to track your social distancing. This new app is called mContain and it’s making this process a little bit easier. It will measure your individual encounters. “So every day, this number will update and you can effectively measure yourself almost like a step counter. You can have your own social distance score.”

The app uses smartphone and Bluetooth technologies to detect encounters that happen within 6 feet for several minutes at a time. mContain can also send you a message about possible exposures to individuals who may have COVID-19.

What we’re doing at this point is when you enter a crowded area and the algorithms pick that up, the mContain app will send you a message the next morning saying, by the way, you visited two or three crowded areas on this particular date.

The app doesn’t collect or share any personal information about you. What it allows for is a quantifiable number, something you can look at a map and see a real measure how people are socially distancing or socially crowding and that allows for the entire community to make informed decisions about what to do.

My competition Assessment: This app doesn’t give you or others alert warning in real time concerning 6 to 20ft or more social distancing while near others.

Credits: FOXNEWS13

X.
The Crowdless App: A Competitive Analysis

A free app developed by LSE students and alumni to help people observe social distancing has gone live and is now available to download. The app, previously called Keep your Distance, has been rebranded as Crowdless and can be found on the Apple app store and the Google Play Store. The app helps people make informed decisions about visiting essential locations, such as supermarkets.

Using AI technology and crowdsourced information, Crowdless provides users with real-time updates on the busyness of certain key locations.

My Competition Assessment:

This app does not identify nearby exposure to feverish individuals as does the Social Distance app.

Credit: The London School of Economics

and Political Science

XI.
Second Apple and Google
Virus Detection App

If a smartphone user fell sick with the novel coronavirus, they’d be diagnosed by their health authority and report this in the app.The iOS and Android devices of other people participating in the program would download these reports and look for a match to see whether they had been in contact with a coronavirus victim.

The whole idea would be to trace and alert those who might also be infected, with the aim of cutting any COVID-19 infection chain. This still is a sort of surveillance. Without a system like this, contact tracers by the thousands will have to rely solely on the memory of ailing COVID-19 patients to learn who else might be infected.

The companies have developed software technology that allows iPhone and Android devices new ways to swap data. Phone users would have to voluntarily enlist in this program by downloading an app from their local healthcare authority. Once installed, their smartphone would use short-distance Bluetooth technology to track all nearby contacts with other people who elected to use the same technology.

The data would be stored on each individual phone and include no names or location information, only a “key” identifier exclusive to each nearby contact. These identifiers would be rotated on a randomized basis to prevent long-term tracking.

My Competition Assessment: This app does not give a real-time reading on close contact presence of a feverish person.

Credit: USA Today

XII.
The Bubble App:
Competitive Analysis

If a smartphone user fell sick with the novel coronavirus, they’d be diagnosed by their health authority and report this in the app. The iOS and Android devices of other people participating in the program would download these reports and look for a match to see whether they had been in contact with a
coronavirus victim.

The whole idea would be to trace and alert those who might also be infected, with the aim of cutting any COVID-19 infection chain.

This still is a sort of surveillance. Without a system like this, contact tracers by the thousands will have to rely solely on the memory of ailing COVID-19 patients to learn who else might be infected.

The companies have developed software technology that allows iPhone and Android devices new ways to swap data. Phone users would have to voluntarily enlist in this program by downloading an app from their local healthcare authority. Once installed, their smartphone would use short-distance Bluetooth technology to track all nearby contacts with other people who elected to use the same technology.

The data would be stored on each individual phone and include no names or location information, only a “key” identifier exclusive to each nearby contact. These identifiers would be rotated on a randomized basis to prevent long-term tracking.

My Competition Assessment: This app does not give a real-time reading on close
contact presence of a feverish person.

(At time of this review, the app is yet to be branded with a name.)

In a few weeks, your smartphone may tell you that you’ve been close to someone infected by the coronavirus and that you may need to isolate yourself.

By mid-May 2020, Apple and Google is offering a mobile software tool that will let

iPhones and Android devices talk to each other and allow digital contact tracing, which tracks those with infections and alerts others who have been in close contact.

Apple and Google will release an API, or application programming interface, that helps a smartphone anonymously detect when it’s been near the smartphone of someone who has reported they have the virus.

That API will let software developers build apps — distributed by public health authorities — that could alert users to potential exposures to COVID-19.

Digital contact tracing doesn’t diagnose infections; it only tells users if they’ve encountered someone who is infected. While other companies are building contact tracing apps, the Apple/Google partnership could greatly expand tracing, since In the U.S., about 81% of us own smartphones, according to a 2019 survey by the Pew Research Center.

My Competition Assessment: This app does not give a real time reading on close contact presence of feverish person.

Credits: George Petras and Jennifer Borresen, USA TODAY

Updated 4:45 p.m. EDT Apr. 28, 2020

XIII.
The Bubble App

If a smartphone user fell sick with the novel coronavirus, they’d be diagnosed by their health authority and report this in the app. The iOS and Android devices of other people participating in the program would download these reports and look for a match to see whether they had been in contact with a coronavirus victim. The whole idea would be to trace and alert those who might also be infected, with the aim of cutting any COVID-19 infection chain.

This still is a sort of surveillance. Without a system like this, contact tracers by the thousands will have to rely solely on the memory of ailing COVID-19 patients to learn who else might be infected.

The companies have developed software technology that allows iPhone and Android devices new ways to swap data. Phone users would have to voluntarily enlist in this program by downloading an app from their local

healthcare authority. Once installed, their smartphone would use short-distance Bluetooth technology to track all nearby contacts with other people who elected to use the same technology.

The data would be stored on each individual phone and include no names or location information, only a “key” identifier exclusive to each nearby contact. These identifiers would be rotated on a randomized basis to prevent long-term tracking.

My Competition Assessment: This app does not give a real time reading on close

contact presence of feverish person.